Archive for January, 2013

MotivationFeeling De-Motivated?

Here are 20 ways you can maximise your level of motivation right now!

By  on January 28, 2013

20 Effective Ways To Stay Motivated

1 – Find your personal mantra

Think of a short slogan to keep your focused (It doesn’t have to be 3 paragraphs long, just a couple of powerful words will do) .Motivational quotes are a good mantra springboard, check ones these out when you need a head pump of motivation.

2 – Get enough sleep

Make sure to spend at least eight hours of your day in deep sleep to allow your body and mind to relax in readiness for the demanding journey ahead. The more R.E.M sleep the better, so make sure you rest your head at a suitable time, preferably before 11pm.

3 – Whatever you eat matters a lot

Whatever you eat can affect not just your physical health but also your psychological wellbeing.

If you are wondering how to get motivated it’s time you started choosing your meals more carefully – especially breakfast. Stick to high energy foods such as fruits, vegetables, eggs and low-fat yoghurt etc. to get the right supply of energy to keep the momentum you need to reach your goals.

4 – Plan your day out

Failure to plan is planning to fail! Get up in the morning and spend about 15 minutes planning your day. Keep in mind that this is a flexible plan just to provide you with a rough sketch of what to do during the day. This way you mentally know what needs to be done and you won’t float around the place with no direction.

5 – Get your swagga up!

The way we dress has a significant bearing to the way we feel throughout our day. Make sure you get out of your PJ’s, do your hair, brush your teeth, so that you are getting your mental and physical into the idea of being ready for something.

6 – Pump up the jamz

Music is a powerful source of motivation. Make it a habit to listen your favorite pumped up tune to inspire a little motivation and power to fight on.

7 – Your body deserves to be rewarded

If you want to stay motivated against all of life’s tides, you have to learn to love yourself first. Treat your body to something nice after achieving certain goals along the way, stretch, pamper your self or grab a massage from a nearby and willing friendly.

8 – Don’t just sit there, get active

If you see yourself spending the most part of your day sitting in front of the TV, you are likely to lose the zeal to take on various life challenges. Hit the road, smash the weights, bounce a ball or skip to get your blood flowing.

9 – Remember some of your best moments

Take a couple of minutes to rush through your peak moments to create a sense of fulfillment. This is a fast and effective positivity technique that really does work.

10 – Don’t just dream; dream biggest

If you can dream it, you can achieve it! So, dream on… and wake up ready to actualize your dreams.

11 – Subscribe to motivational newsletters and emails

Keep feeding your mind with positive content. Identify some top-notch inspirational names on the net and subscribe to their mailing lists to receive constant support messages. Or just visit Addicted2Success.com on the daily :)

12 – Associate with positive minded people

If you tend to spend the bulk of your time around negative, de-motivated and short-term friends, chances are that you are also going to lose your focus. Invest in inspired and optimistic friends. Jim Rohn said it best when he said “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.”

13 – Share your goals

To create a sense of responsibility, share your goals with close friends and accomplices.

14 – Don’t do it single-handedly

Don’t block your path to success by locking out important people out of your life. Make sure to invest in a stable support network. Strength in numbers baby!

15 – One step at a time

Being successful is something gradual. Take small but smart steps and before you realize it, you’ll have achieved a huge milestone. Remember, “Rome wasn’t built in a day.”

16 – Look at the glass as half full, not half empty

Pessimism can ruin your motivation greatly. Learn to stay positive in your quest by focusing on your positive achievements rather than on your failures. From each failure we learn how we can do things even better the next time. Embrace your failures and keep your head up because you are one step closer than you were yesterday.

17 – Get real with yourself

If you feel de-motivated, find a mirror and give yourself a good look. Urge yourself forward by saying something like…”James you can make it!” Affirmations work, they pump you up and help you psych yourself into the state of mind needed to make things happen.

18 – Read inspirational books

Books are golden gems as far as motivation building is concerned. Read motivational books, listen to audio books while you drive, read auto biographies of those who you admire, the greats, those who have persevered through thick and thin.

19 – Take a deep breath

Take a second to chill, breathe in deeply and exhale slowly ten times. As you do so, take time to think of good things in your life (as suggested in tip 9). We are more effective when we are not scatter brained about things, you want to be as clear minded as possible to focus on your goals for the day, week or month.

20 – Invest in others

This is actually the most powerful motivation tip of them all. If you help others, it will empower you with a fulfilling energy to achieve great things yourself. You are someone of value, your confidence levels will be boosted and you will have more faith in what you are capable of because you have shown to yourself, and others, that you are a man of value heart and skills.

As you continue to move towards your life goals, we wish you all the best, every step of the way!

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By on January 23, 2013

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Here is a collection of 22 Strength & Courage Quotes, for a little inspiration to get you through those hard times.

 Strength & Courage Quotes

“Sometimes you don’t realize your own strength until you come face to face with your greatest weakness.” – Susan Gale

“Beliefs have the power to create and the power to destroy. Human beings have the awesome ability to take any experience of their lives and create a meaning that disempowers them or one that can literally save their lives.” – Tony Robbins

“Man can live about forty days without food, about three days without water, about eight minutes without air, but only for one second without hope” – Hal Lindsey

“Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all.” – Dale Carnegie

“Courage doesn’t always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, “I will try again tomorrow.” – Mary Anne Radmacher

“The brave may not live forever, but the cautious dont live at all.” – Ashley L

Anyone can give up, it’s the easiest thing in the world to do. But to hold it together when everyone else would understand if you fell apart, that’s true strength. – Unknown

“Never say never, because limits, like fears, are often just an illusion.” – Michael Jordan

“Dream as if you’ll live forever, live as if you’ll die today.” – James Dean

“True strength is keeping everything together when everyone expects you to fall apart.” – Unknown

“Fall seven times, stand up eight.” – Chinese Proverb

“You were given this life, because you are strong enough to live it.” – Robin Sharma

“Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength.” – Arnold Schwarzenegger

“In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer.” – Albert Camus

“Anyone can hide. Facing up to things, working through them, that’s what makes you strong.” – Sarah Dessen

“Courage is looking fear right in the eye and saying, “Get the hell out of my way, I’ve got things to do.” – Unknown

“Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom. A man can’t ride you unless your back is bent.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Nobody can hurt me without my permission.” – Mahatma Gandhi

“Life will break you. Nobody can protect you from that, and living alone won’t either, for solitude will also break you with its yearning. You have to love. You have to feel. It is the reason you are here on earth. You are here to risk your heart. You are here to be swallowed up. And when it happens that you are broken, or betrayed, or left, or hurt, or death brushes near, let yourself sit by an apple tree and listen to the apples falling all around you in heaps, wasting their sweetness. Tell yourself you tasted as many as you could.” – Louise Erdrich, The Painted Drum LP

“If you always put limit on everything you do, physical or anything else. It will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.” – Bruce Lee

“In the end, some of your greatest pains become your greatest strengths.” ― Drew Barrymore

“Anyone can give up, it’s the easiest thing to do. But to hold yourself together when everyone would expect you to fall apart; that is true strength.” – Unknown

We hope you enjoyed this collection of inspirational quotes.Please share these with your friends and family.

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Posted: 01/03/2013 12:48 am

“Happiness is having a large, caring, close-knit family in another city.” — George Burns

How happy are you and why? This is a question I spend a fair amount of time thinking about, not only as it applies to my own levels of happiness, but also as it applies to my family, friends, and the people who I work with. Since graduating with my master’s degree in positive psychology, I’ve worked with and observed thousands of people in a wide variety of settings, and happy people just flow with the groove of life in a unique way. Here is what they do differently:

They build a strong social fabric. Happy people stay connected to their families, neighbors, places of worship, and communities. These strong connections act as a buffer to depression and create strong, meaningful connections. The rate of depression has increased dramatically in the last 50 to 75 years. The World Health Organization predicts that by 2020, depression will be the second leading cause of mortality in the world, impacting nearly one-third of all adults. While several forces are likely behind this increase, one of the most important factors may be the disconnection from people and their families and communities.

They engage in activities that fit their strengths, values and lifestyle. One size does not fit all when it comes to happiness strategies. You tailor your workout to your specific fitness goals — happy people do the same thing with their emotional goals. Some strategies that are known to promote happiness are just too corny for me, but the ones that work best allow me to practice acts of kindness, express gratitude, and become fully engaged. Dr. Sonja Lyubomirsky offers a wonderful “Person-Activity Fit Diagnostic” in her book The How of Happiness.

They practice gratitude. Gratitude does the body good. It helps you cope with trauma and stress, increases self-worth and self-esteem when you realize how much you’ve accomplished, and often helps dissolve negative emotions. Research also suggests that the character strength of gratitude is a fairly strong correlate with life satisfaction.[1]

They have an optimistic thinking style. Happy people rein in their pessimistic thinking in three ways. First, they focus their time and energy on where they have control. They know when to move on if certain strategies aren’t working or if they don’t have control in a specific area. Second, they know that “this too shall pass.” Happy people “embrace the suck” and understand that while the ride might be bumpy at times, it won’t last forever. Finally, happy people are good at compartmentalizing. They don’t let an adversity in one area of their life seep over into other areas of their life.

They know it’s good to do good. Happy people help others by volunteering their time. Research shows a strong association between helping behavior and well-being, health, and longevity. Acts of kindness help you feel good about yourself and others, and the resulting positive emotions enhance your psychological and physical resilience. One study followed five women who had multiple sclerosis over a three-year period of time.[2] These women volunteered as peer supporters for 67 other MS patients. The results showed that the five peer support volunteers experienced positive changes that were larger than the benefits shown by the patients they supported.

They know that material wealth is only a very small part of the equation. Happy people have a healthy perspective about how much joy material possessions will bring. In The How of Happiness, Lyubomirsky explains that in 1940, Americans reported being “very happy” with an average score of 7.5 out of 10.[3] Fast forward to today, and with all of our iPods, color TVs, computers, fast cars, and an income that has more than doubled, what do you think our average happiness score is today? It’s 7.2. Not only does materialism not bring happiness, it’s a strong predictor of unhappiness. One study examined the attitudes of 12,000 freshman when they were eighteen, then measured their life satisfaction at age 37. Those who had expressed materialistic aspirations as freshmen were less satisfied with their lives two decades later.[4]

They develop healthy coping strategies.. Happy people encounter stressful life adversities, but they have developed successful coping strategies. Post-traumatic growth is the positive personal changes that result from an individual’s struggle to deal with highly challenging life events, and it occurs in a wide range of people facing a wide variety of challenging circumstances. According to researchers Tedeschi and Calhoun, there are five factors or areas of growth after a challenging event: renewed appreciation for life, recognizing new paths for your life, enhanced personal strength, improved relationships with others, and spiritual growth. Happy people become skilled at seeing the good that might come from challenging times.

They focus on health. Happy people take care of their mind and body and manage their stress. Focusing on your health, though, doesn’t just mean exercising. Happy people actually act like happy people. They smile, are engaged, and bring an optimal level of energy and enthusiasm to what they do.

They cultivate spiritual emotions. According to Lyubomirsky, there is a growing body of science suggesting that religious people are happier, healthier, and recover more quickly from trauma than nonreligious people.[5] In addition, authors Ed Diener and Robert Biswas-Diener explain in their book Happiness: Unlocking the Mysteries of Psychological Wealth that spiritual emotions are essential to psychological wealth and happiness because they help us connect to something larger than ourselves.

They have direction. Working toward meaningful life goals is one of the most important strategies happy people utilize. I downplayed the importance of meaning during my law practice, but it became evident how much meaning mattered in my life when I burned out. Happy people have values that they care about and outcomes that are worth working for, according to Diener and Biswas-Diener.

The late, great Dr. Chris Peterson talked about his own journey with happiness as follows: “I spent my young adult years postponing many of the small things that I knew would make me happy … I was fortunate enough to realize that I would never have the time unless I made the time. And then the rest of my life began.”

Happy people have developed a specific set of strategies over time that causes them to see life differently — a balanced portfolio of skills and emotions. What would you add to this list?
Paula Davis-Laack, JD, MAPP, is an internationally-known writer and stress and resilience expert who helps high-achievers manage stress and increase well-being by mastering a set of skills proven to enhance resilience, build mental toughness, and promote strong relationships. Connect with Paula via:
Her website:
www.marieelizbethcompany.com
Facebook:
www.facebook.com/marieelizabethcompany
Twitter:
www.twitter.com/pauladavislaack

References

[1] Park, N., Peterson, C., & Seligman, M.E.P. (2004). “Strengths of character and well-being.” Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 23(5), 603-619.

[2] Schwarz, C.E., & Sendor, M. (1999). “Helping others help oneself: Response shift effects in peer support.” Social Science and Medicine, 48, 1563-75.

[3] Lane, R.E. (2000). The loss of happiness in market democracies. New Haven: Yale University Press. See Figure 1.1, p.5.

[4] Nickerson, C., Schwartz, N., Diener, E., & Kahneman, D. (2003). “Zeroing in on the dark side of the American dream: A closer look at the negative consequences of the goal for financial success.” Psychological Science, 14, 531-36.

[5] Ellison, C.G., & Levin, J.S. (1998). “The religion-health connection: Evidence, theory, and future directions.” Health Education and Behavior, 25, 700-20.

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